About

Trips

Amnesty International
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We went to Stanford to listen to a talk by Stephen Hawkins about his work with Amnesty International, and his interest in human rights for people of all ages. Afterwards many of the SJP students ask questions, and wrote a blog post about the trip.

Camp Unity in Camp Harmon

Camp Unity was one of the best experiences of the year. Although it was only three days, we managed to connect on the deepest level with 40 other students. Through discussion, role-play, and games, we learned about the impact of racism, sexism, and stereotypes on people in our community and the world.

Selma
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During our freedom and human rights themed unit, we decided to go to the movie theater to watch Selma and see how Hollywood’s depiction and the historical depiction differed. After returning from the movie theater, we had a discussion on the difference of how our characters and events were represented in the movie compared to the reality. We found that although many ideas from real life were illustrated properly in the film, many of the events were exaggerated in order to make it more interesting to the public.

Ai Wei Wei Exhibit on Alcatraz
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Our class went to Alcatraz not only to explore the ancient prison, but also to explore the amazing art of Ai Weiwei. His art had a central theme: freedom. Ironic? Yes. Powerful? Absolutely. Justice involves putting away those who deserve it and setting free those who were falsely convicted. Weiwei's pieces perfectly convey this, making our trip to Alcatraz the perfect learning experience.

MLK Institute
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At the Martin Luther King Institute, we were able to see artifacts from the Civil Rights Movement, specifically involving MLK. We were also shown their filing system, as well as many books written with the information they house.

Cantor Art Museum
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Our field trip to Cantor Art Museum at Stanford was an adventure into the world of Jacob Lawrence. Lawrence is an American artist who shows the world through the eyes of a young African-American child in the big, dangerous city. His fascination with workers and their tools gives his art a realistic vibe, although his style is quite abstract. We viewed the exhibition and learned about the history of the time period.